Peking Duck Fried Rice

Peking duck fried rice tastes way better than takeout. Let me tell you a secret – you don’t need duck meat or a wok to cook this.

Peking duck fried rice tastes way better than takeout. Let me tell you a secret - you don’t need duck meat or a wok to cook this. | omnivorescookbook.com

The recipe name might sound fancy, but it actually just uses a sauce that resembles the taste of Peking duck. The sauce goes well with many different ingredients, so it’s definitely a great one to add to your weekday dinner recipe box.

I invented the dish when I was trying to use leftover roast duck meat to create a quick lunch. Instead of using my go-to fried rice recipes (soy sauce fried rice and chicken fried rice), I poured in hoisin sauce because it’s the first thing that pops into my mind whenever I deal with duck meat. It turned out to be one of the best fried rices I’ve ever had!

This fried rice recipe belongs to the category of recipes that I’d highly recommend to anyone new to Chinese cooking. It’s a flexible recipe and very forgiving. You are unlikely to overcook it. You do not need a wok and can easily adapt the recipe to whatever ingredients you have on hand. The prep takes ten minutes and the cooking takes another ten. When you taste the rice, you’ll wonder how such a simple dish tastes better than one at a Chinese restaurant.

Peking duck fried rice tastes way better than takeout. Let me tell you a secret - you don’t need duck meat or a wok to cook this. | omnivorescookbook.com

Cooking Notes

When you finish prep, you should have these few things near your stove: the 3-ingredient sauce, leftover rice, garlic and onion, any leftover meat (or skip it), and a few handfuls of veggies.

You see, this is the beautiful part of Chinese cooking. It uses minimal ingredients, yet the finished dish is delicious and full of color.

Peking duck fried rice tastes way better than takeout. Let me tell you a secret - you don’t need duck meat or a wok to cook this. | omnivorescookbook.comPeking duck fried rice tastes way better than takeout. Let me tell you a secret - you don’t need duck meat or a wok to cook this. | omnivorescookbook.com

Simply remember one thing during cooking – heat up the pan with high heat and keep using a high enough heat to keep the pan hot. A very hot pan allows the rice to get a nice sear, so you gain a wok-like texture, even using a nonstick skillet.

Then you can leave it to the sauce to work its magic. Hoisin sauce contains sugar, which caramelizes very well during cooking. Even if you cook the rice a bit too long, it will only get better. The rice will lose some moisture and separate, eventually becoming beautifully charred.

The ingredients in this recipe are very flexible. If you do not have leftover duck, no worries! The recipe will go very well with any leftover meat, or even without meat. I used kale to add color and nutrition. You can replace it with mustard greens or spinach. To throw in veggies without prep, use frozen green peas or carrots. Too daunting to cook the egg separately? Scramble the egg into the rice in one pan.

That’s it!

Peking duck fried rice tastes way better than takeout. Let me tell you a secret - you don’t need duck meat or a wok to cook this. | omnivorescookbook.comIf you give this recipe a try, let us know! Leave a comment, rate it (once you’ve tried it), and take a picture and tag it #omnivorescookbook on Instagram! I’d love to see what you come up with. Cheers, friends!

Peking Duck Fried Rice
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Author:
Recipe type: Main
Cuisine: Chinese
Serves: 2
Ingredients
Sauce
  • 2 tablespoons hoisin sauce
  • 2 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 1/2 teaspoon cumin powder
  • (Optional) 1/8 teaspoon chili powder
Fried rice
  • 1 tablespoon vegetable oil
  • 2 to 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 to 3 carrots, sliced
  • 1 cup leftover roast duck (or any leftover meat), torn into small pieces
  • (Optional) 1 tablespoon Shaoxing wine
  • 4 cups leftover rice
  • 3 to 4 green onions, chopped
  • 2 cups kale (or spinach, or mustard greens), stems removed and chopped
  • Salt to taste
Garnish (Optional)
  • 2 eggs
  • 8 to 10 asparagus spears
  • 2 tomatoes, chopped
Instructions
  1. Combine all the ingredients for the sauce in a small bowl, mix well.
  2. Gather all the chopped veggies and the sauce near the stove.
  3. Heat oil in a large nonstick skillet (or a wok) over medium high heat until hot. Add garlic. Stir a few times until fragrant. Add carrot. Cook until it starts to get tender.
    Peking Duck Fried Rice Nutrition Facts | omnivorescookbook.com Peking Duck Fried Rice Nutrition Facts | omnivorescookbook.com
  4. Add duck meat (or other leftover meat). Stir and cook until slightly charred. (See Footnote 1)
  5. (Optional) Pour in Shaoxing wine. Stir until the liquid evaporates.
  6. Add rice. Stir and chop with a spatula to separate the rice.
    Peking Duck Fried Rice Nutrition Facts | omnivorescookbook.com Peking Duck Fried Rice Nutrition Facts | omnivorescookbook.com
  7. Pour sauce over the rice. Continue cooking and stirring until the sauce is evenly mixed.
  8. Add kale. Stir and cook until the kale is cooked through.
    Peking Duck Fried Rice Nutrition Facts | omnivorescookbook.com Peking Duck Fried Rice Nutrition Facts | omnivorescookbook.com
  9. Turn to low heat and adjust seasoning by adding more salt, if necessary. If you like charred rice, let it cook a bit longer, or simply turn off heat and leave the rice in the pan for a few minutes. Transfer everything to serving plates.
    Peking Duck Fried Rice Nutrition Facts | omnivorescookbook.com
(Optional) Sides
  1. Cook sunny side up egg and transfer on top of the rice.
  2. To cook a quick side, use the hot pan to grill asparagus. Season with salt and pepper.
  3. Transfer asparagus to the side of the rice and top it with chopped tomato. You can also drizzle on a few drops of olive oil and balsamic vinegar to create a simple salad.
  4. Serve warm.
Notes
1. If you want to scramble in the eggs, move all the ingredients to one side of the pan. Add beaten egg to the other side. Let cook until the bottom sets. Add rice on top of the egg. Continue cooking according to the recipe.

The nutrition facts are calculated based on 1 of the 2 servings generated by this recipe (including the egg and side).

Peking Duck Fried Rice Cooking Process | omnivorescookbook.com

Peking duck fried rice tastes way better than takeout. Let me tell you a secret - you don’t need duck meat or a wok to cook this. | omnivorescookbook.com

Disclosure

Omnivore's Cookbook is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com.
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Meet Maggie

Hi I'm Maggie Zhu! Welcome to my site about modern Chinese cooking - including street food, family recipes, and restaurant dishes. I take a less labor-intensive approach while maintaining the taste and look of the dish. I am originally from Beijing, and now cook from my Austin, Texas kitchen.

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