Easy Hand-Pulled Noodles (拉面, la mian dough)

These freshly made hand-pulled noodles are springy and meaty, with a great mouthfeel that you’ll never get from dried noodles. Learn all the secrets of hand-pulled noodles so you can easily make them at home without fail!

Easy Hand-Pulled Noodles Recipe | omnivorescookbook.com

Noodles are one of the most important components of Chinese food culture. Handmade noodles might be a rarity, and even a pricey proposition outside of China. However, in the domestic market, they are an everyday cheap comfort food. No matter whether ordering a hot bowl of noodles in a restaurant or purchasing freshly made noodles to cook at home, it is one of the cheapest ways to have a fast, fulfilling, and hearty one-dish meal. Even in expensive cities like Beijing, you can still spend 3 to 4 dollars to get a very decent big bowl of noodles in a restaurant. The price drops to 2 dollars per meal when you go to smaller cities.

Despite the low cost of noodles at restaurants, a lot of people still enjoy making them from scratch at home. The reason? Because:

  1. It’s just so easy to make hand pulled noodles once you’ve learned the trick
  2. The homemade kind doesn’t contain any additives. A restaurant’s fresh noodles usually have additives for a better mouthfeel. Additives also allow the noodles to be easily produced in big batches and to have a longer shelf life
  3. The finished dish is tailored to your taste. You can season it with whatever ingredients you prefer and add as many toppings as you like.

There are countless types of noodles in China and I will introduce you to the hand-pulled (拉面, la mian) variety first. It might sound daunting to make this type of noodle at home, especially if you’ve ever watched a noodle dance in China. But the truth is, hand-pulled noodles are one of the easiest handmade noodles for a beginner to make.

No-Fail Hand Pulled Noodle - Step-by-Step pictures with cooking video to show you how to easily make hand-pulled noodle from scratch | omnivorescookbook.com

Why hand-pulled noodles are the easiest homemade noodles and the one you should learn first

This leads me back to one of my fun cooking experiences several years ago. Back in 2011, I was still quite bad at cooking and didn’t cook as much as I do now. One day, my boyfriend and I decided to try to make hand shaved noodles (刀削面, dao xiao mian).

If you’re wondering what the hell that is, it’s a specialty from Shanxi province. To cook it, you need to make a block of very tough dough and use one hand to hold the dough and the other to use a special square-bladed knife to carve off thin pieces of dough directly into boiling water. Sometimes for the sake of performance, a chef will put the dough on his head and use both hands to slice noodles into the pot. It’s quite a scene, in a circus act kind of way.

Long story short, we didn’t manage to get the dough right and it was too soft to slice. Since we didn’t want to waste it and the noodle sauce was ready, we started to pull the dough by hand and made our first bowl of hand-pulled noodles at home.

You see what I did there? Even when you fail at making other types of noodles, you can still use the dough to make hand-pulled noodles, because they’re such a no brainer!

No-Fail Hand Pulled Noodle - Step-by-Step pictures with cooking video to show you how to easily make hand-pulled noodle from scratch | omnivorescookbook.com

The ONLY three tips you need to make no-fail hand-pulled noodles:

  1. Make a dough that is not too tough.
  2. Add the right amount of salt.
  3. Let the dough rest for enough time.

That’s it! Done! I’m finished.

OK, I’m kidding. Let me give you a more detailed explanation.

The texture of the dough depends entirely on the ratio of the flour, water, and salt. To make the dough work, it has to be tough enough, so the noodles won’t break apart when you pull them. At the same time, the dough needs to be soft enough, so you can easily pull it into a thin piece. The salt adds springiness to the dough. If you add too much, the dough will be very difficult to pull. Conversely, the noodles will fall apart if you don’t add enough salt.

On the other hand, the ratio of the flour, water, and salt in the dough for hand-pulled noodles is actually quite flexible. This means, even if you didn’t replicate exactly the same texture of dough in this recipe (especially if the dough is a bit drier), the dish won’t fail. This leads us to the most important factor, the amount of time you allow the dough to rest.

Hand Pulled Noodle - Step-by-Step pictures with cooking video to show you how to easily make hand-pulled noodle from scratch | omnivorescookbook.com

Let me put this in an extreme way – if you let the dough rest long enough, almost ANY ratio of flour, water and salt will work. What I mean by “enough” here, is more than a day, perhaps even longer. The longer you let the dough rest, the smoother and tenderer its texture will become. This makes the dough easier for you to handle when preparing and cooking it. For example, if you find the dough too tough and difficult to pull, simply let it rest a few more hours. You’ll eventually get noodles out of it.

I have tried different ratios to make this dish work, but I found that the ratio in the recipe below works best. It’s not too soft to knead and requires less resting time. Depending on your room temperature (particularly if it’s warmer than average), you can even use less resting time than prescribed here. But remember, the longer you let the dough rest, the easier you’ll have it, when it comes time to pull the noodles.

No-Fail Hand Pulled Noodle - Step-by-Step pictures with cooking video to show you how to easily make hand-pulled noodle from scratch | omnivorescookbook.com

Why should you trust this recipe?

Here, I want to attribute this recipe to my grandpa’s housekeeper, Ms. Jiang. She grew up in and has lived in Gansu province, which is famous for its hand-pulled noodles (Lanzhou hand-pulled beef noodles, to be specific), for more than 30 years. She has been cooking and eating this noodle dish almost daily, until now. When I asked for the recipe, she was happy to teach me, although she never uses any measurements for it. I followed her instructions as closely as I could, and I tried cooking the noodles multiple times to test them out.

Here, I created a short video to show you how easy it is to craft your own hand pulled noodles at home.

If you like the video, don’t forget to check out my YouTube channel! I have a collection of cooking videos that walk you through the delicious recipes at Omnivore’s Cookbook. It is one of the fastest ways for you to get used to the techniques that are used in Chinese cooking!

4.8 from 11 reviews
Easy Hand-Pulled Noodles
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Author:
Recipe type: Main
Cuisine: Chinese
Serves: 4-6
Ingredients
  • 400 grams (14 ounces) all-purpose flour and extra to dust the working surface
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 280 milliliter (9.5 ounces) water (room temperature)
Instructions
To prepare the dough
  1. Combine flour and salt in a large bowl and mix well. Slowly blend in water and mix with a pair of chopsticks, until water is integrated with the flour and there is no dry flour left. Dust both hands with dry flour, then start to knead by hand until dough forms. The dough should be quite soft and sticky.
    Hand-pulled Noodle Cooking Process | omnivorescookbook.com Hand-pulled Noodle Cooking Process | omnivorescookbook.com
  2. Dust a working surface with dry flour. Transfer the dough onto it and continue to knead until the surface turns smooth and the texture springy, 10 to 15 minutes. Dust hands and the working surface with extra flour whenever the dough starts to feel sticky during the process.
    Hand-pulled Noodle Cooking Process | omnivorescookbook.com
  3. Alternatively you can use a stand mixer to make the dough. Attach the dough hook to the mixer, transfer the flour and the water into the bowl, and turn on low speed. Stop the mixer and scrape the flour from the bowl if needed. Mix until the dough becomes smooth and elastic, about 15 minutes.
  4. Dust a large bowl with dry flour. Transfer the dough to that bowl and cover the dough with a damp dish towel. Cover the bowl with a lid (or plastic wrap). Let the dough rest at room temperature for at least 2 hours (or store the dough in the fridge if you're planning to use it the next day, after resting at room temperature).
  5. Dust the working surface and both hands with flour. Transfer the dough onto the working surface and knead it a few times. Divide the dough into 2 equal pieces, then again to make 4 pieces total. Knead each piece of dough by hand to shape a ball.
    Hand-pulled Noodle Cooking Process | omnivorescookbook.com Hand-pulled Noodle Cooking Process | omnivorescookbook.com
  6. Dust the working surface again. Take one piece of dough and press it into a round disc. Roll it with a rolling pin into a long and round sheet, about 5 to 6 millimeters (0.2 inches) thick. Roll out the rest of the dough pieces the same way. Use large bowls or plastic wrap to cover and seal the dough sheets, to keep them from drying out. Let rest for another 30 minutes to 1 hour.
To pull and cook the noodles
  1. Right before making noodles, bring a medium sized pot of water to a roaring boil (very important).
  2. Work on the dough sheets one by one. You should cover the rest of the dough with a damp dish towel or plastic wrap.
  3. Slice the dough sheet into several strips, about 2 centimeters (0.8 inches) wide (or narrower if you want thinner noodles).
    Hand-pulled Noodle Cooking Process | omnivorescookbook.com Hand-pulled Noodle Cooking Process | omnivorescookbook.com
  4. Pick up a strip of dough and start to pull it from one end to shape an evenly thick, long noodle, until it becomes quite thin and almost breaks apart. It’s OK if the noodle breaks into 2 to 3 shorter segments. Drop the noodle immediately into the boiling water. (To get the idea of the process, please refer to this short video.)
  5. Pull another 2 to 3 strips of dough and drop them into the boiling water. Cover the rest of the dough with a damp dish towel (see footnote). Boil the noodles until cooked through, 1 to 2 minutes. Transfer to a plate and set aside. Work on the rest of the dough in the same manner.
    No-Fail Hand Pulled Noodle - Step-by-Step pictures with cooking video to show you how to easily make hand-pulled noodle from scratch | omnivorescookbook.com No-Fail Hand Pulled Noodle - Step-by-Step pictures with cooking video to show you how to easily make hand-pulled noodle from scratch | omnivorescookbook.com
To serve and store
  1. You can use the noodles in any noodle soup or mix them with sauce. If you aren’t going to serve the noodles immediately, add a few drops of sesame oil onto them and mix by hand. You should always eat the noodles while they’re warm and fresh, because they will become sticky and turn into a solid mass once they cool off.
  2. Store leftover noodles in an air-tight container in the fridge for 1 to 2 days.
  3. To serve leftover noodles, place them in a colander so that you can easily dip them into a pot of boiling water. When you do this, use a pair of chopsticks to gently separate the noodles, and leave them in the water until warm. Heating them this way shouldn’t take more than 30 seconds.
Notes
The noodles are very easy to cook through, so I suggest you cook them in small batches, until you’re familiar with the process. You should always cover the unused dough with a damp dish towel or plastic wrap, because it will dry out very fast.

The nutrition facts are calculated based on 1 of the 4 servings generated from this recipe.

Hand Pulled Noodle - Nutrition facts | omnivorescookbook.com

Enjoy the delicious hand-pulled noodles with

Lanzhou Beef Noodles | omnivorescookbook.com
Lanzhou Beef Noodles (兰州拉面)
The springy noodles are served with a rich beef broth, melt-in-your-mouth beef, tender radish and a splash of freshly made chili oil.

Tomato Noodle Soup - The Ultimate Comfort Food | omnivorescookbook.com

Tomato Noodle Soup
My ultimate comfort food – the soup is cooked with a rich tomato base and chicken stock. You can add all sorts of leftover in this soup and have it ready in less than 30 minutes!

Green Beans with Spicy Peanut Sauce | omnivorescookbook.com
Green Beans with Spicy Peanut Sauce
This recipe uses garlic, peanut butter, soy sauce and chili oil to make a finger-licking sweet savory and spicy sauce. It seems like a perfect side dish, but the truth is, you can use the same sauce on the noodles too and it is YUMMY!

Chinese chili oil | Omnivore's Cookbook
Chinese Chili Oil
A necessary ingredient in your pantry, it adds a nice kick to your dumpling, noodle and stir fried dishes. Try out the freshly cooked chili oil, you’ll never go back to the supermarket one again.

Disclosure

Omnivore's Cookbook is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com.
Share:
Meet Maggie

Hi I'm Maggie Zhu! Welcome to my site about modern Chinese cooking - including street food, family recipes, and restaurant dishes. I take a less labor-intensive approach while maintaining the taste and look of the dish. I am originally from Beijing, and now cook from my Austin, Texas kitchen.

Never Miss a Recipe!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Rate this recipe:  

46 thoughts on “Easy Hand-Pulled Noodles (拉面, la mian dough)

  1. Rachelle

    Wow! I love hand pulled noodles and these look delicious! Do you have any recipe recommendations for how to serve them? I love them with spicy sauces and in meaty soups.

    Do you recommend eating these cold at all? One of my favorite dishes is noodles served cold with spicy oils and other dressings.

    Also, what temperature do you recommend the water be at when adding it to the flour? Some recipes call for very cold/hot water, but I didn’t know if that mattered for this dough.

    Thanks!

    Reply
    1. Maggie Post author

      Hi Rachelle, I’m so glad to hear you like hand pulled noodles! I have a new noodle soup recipe coming this Friday. It uses a beef broth with chili oil. I will drop you another note when the recipe is published. I also have a recipe that uses tomato and pork stock as broth. You can find it here.

      Yes, you can definitely serve these noodles cold. What you can do is, after boiling the noodles, rinse them with cold water immediately, so the noodles will cool down fast and still be fresh. I like to add chili oil and peanut sauce in the noodles! (I have a cold noodle recipe here.)

      Sorry I forgot to specify about the water. You should use room temperature water in this one. Thanks for reminding me this and I will add this information into the recipe now!

      Many thanks again Rachelle, it’s a great idea to add some noodle sauce recipes in this post, so I can show my readers how to serve the hand pulled noodles. Really glad you pointed it out 🙂

      Happy cooking and let me know how the noodles turn out! 🙂

      Reply
  2. [email protected] Eats

    NO WAY!! YOU ROCK! I have never ever made my own noodles but now I am going to try! You’re a legend Maggie!! 🙂

    Reply
  3. Patty

    I love these! Your boyfriend and I ended up making hand-pulled noodles when I, too, failed to make a dough-block hearty enough for my noodle-knife a few years ago. The chicken-mushroom stew recipe you gave him to accompany it was phenomenal.

    Reply
    1. Maggie Post author

      Hey Patty, it’s interesting to hear that you came across the same situation 🙂 Also thank you for letting me know that the noodles go well with the chicken and mushroom stew. I never thought of this combination, but will definitely try out! By the way, I’m still looking for a way to work out the tough dough to make these hand shaved noodles. Will let you know when I figure that secret out!

      Reply
      1. Thomas

        It wasn’t the recent chicken mushroom stew, but the family secret pork-mushroom-yellow-flower-shrimp one, with chicken in place of the pork. Who knows, maybe we’ll see that recipe here soon? 😉

  4. Christine | No Gojis No Glory

    $3-$4 for a big bowl of noodles?! Try $7-$12 here; and that’s in “China town” where it’s supposedly cheaper. I think I can get like two spring rolls for $3.00. lol But this is really cool Maggie, and I had no idea it was so easy. Would this work using wheat flour?

    Reply
  5. [email protected]

    I’m always in awe when I see hand pulled noodles being made and well done for being able to do this. I want to try this, but I would need someone right there to guide me.

    Reply
  6. Prash @ YummilyYours

    WOW! WOW! you make it look so simple! I am going to try this soon but a small batch though may be just the 3-4 strips of dough? I am quite skeptical about me pulling it off! 😀 I will let you know how it turned out with pictures! 🙂

    Reply
    1. Maggie Post author

      Hi Prash, yes, you can definitely try half batch (200 grams flour). This one is really easy and I’m pretty sure you’ll pull the noodles successfully for the first try. Definitely let me how how it goes and really looking forward to see the pictures! Hope the cooking goes well 🙂

      Reply
  7. Sarah

    Hi Maggie! This recipe is great! I am from the Shanxi province, and my family loves hand-making our noodles. 🙂 So happy to see you like hand-made noodles too. The video is very helpful!

    Reply
  8. Leon

    Thank you very much for this recipe.

    My first attempt failed. I chose the option to let the dough rise overnight in the fridge. This made the dough very firm and difficult to pull, even after bringing back to room temp.

    The second attempt was much better. I let the dough rise at room temp, which made the dough much more pliable. However, I couldn’t get the dough as thin as yours. Though elastic, the dough would lose it’s width and become thin noodles when stretched. I will experiment with a flatter dough cut into thicker strips next time.

    I should add that a roaring boil was essential to cooking the noodles. I started with a large pot that couldn’t hold a boil and I was left with a dissolved exterior. The roaring boil gave the noodles a chewy texture.

    Thanks again for the recipe. I really enjoy and appreciate your blog!

    -Leon

    Reply
    1. Maggie Post author

      Hi Leon, thanks so much for the feedback! These suggestions are super helpful.
      I didn’t explain it well, about storing the dough in the fridge. I was meant to say – let the dough to rest at room temperature first, and then transfer and store in the fridge if you won’t use it at the same day.
      The “roaring boil” description is very accurate. I have updated these two points in the recipes. Many many thanks for this input!
      To create wide noodles, you do need to cut them to wide strips. They do become thin when stretched. Have you tried to let the dough to rest a bit longer? You should able to get thin dough, if you pull them slowly and gradually, from one end to another.
      Keep me updated if you will cook this again! I’m really glad you tried my recipes 🙂
      Have a super day!

      Reply
  9. yudi huang

    Hii Maggie, I’m Yudi. I would like to make hand pulled noodles and vegetarian dishes by asian and chinese food recipes.

    I hope you will be pleased me to see and use your practiced recipes.
    I see your web give a step by step to cooking with detail. I’m so interested.

    And permit me to rewrite it on my book and permit me to try it too. Thank You

    Reply
    1. Maggie Post author

      Hi Yudi, I’m happy to hear you like my recipes and would like to try them out! Of course you can rewrite the recipe, as long as you use your own words. Let me know how the cooking goes 🙂 Have a nice day!

      Reply
  10. Meg

    I made these last night and wow, they were amazing. Your recipe and instructions are perfect. I’m hooked. There is a Chinese restaurant local to me that makes the most amazing pork belly noodle soup with hand pulled noodles and I’d eat that every day if I could so it was the best feeling to be able to make them at home!

    Reply
    1. Maggie Post author

      Hi Meg, I’m so happy to hear you tried this recipe and liked it! I always wonder people are so busy these days, so they probably don’t have time to make noodles from scratch. The fresh ones taste really different don’t they? I have a pork belly recipe here: http://omnivorescookbook.com/recipes/authentic-pork-belly-bun I believe the broth and the pork will be a nice addition to these noodles 🙂 I want to try the pork belly noodle soup too. It sounds so delicious!

      Reply
  11. Frank A. Lojewski

    Are you Maggie Vermillion (Zhu, Chu)? My wifeepoo is that red color Chu.

    Anyhow, I have tried noodles with Canadian wheat flour and even after aging, still would not “pull”. This is probably due to the high protein content?! I read that cake flour is the better choice, something I am unable to obtain here. Any suggestions?

    As to ribbon dance noodles, I saw one performed in Chengde, but this young man was not merely athletic, he was artistic enough to head a ballet group! But I did not bring a camera to the restaurant, darn!

    Reply
    1. Maggie Post author

      Hi Frank, I’m Maggie Zhu. Yep, the color red.
      I’m sorry to hear the recipe didn’t work out for you. How long did you rest the dough? It always takes longer if your room is cold. To answer your question about the flour type, actually the flour with higher gluten content works better. We never used cake flour to make these noodles. The normal wheat flour (I use all purpose one) should work. The only solution I can think of, it’s to let the dough rest longer. It will get tenderer over the time, and become able to pull.
      This is not the type of the noodle for the noodle dance. To make the dance noodles, you need to blend alkaline and oil into the dough, so it becomes resilient and holds together when being pulled faster (similar type of dough to Japanese ramen). It’s a bit trouble for everyday cooking, so I posted this version instead.
      Isn’t it true that we spent money on a good camera, but it’s never next to us every time we need it? I mostly use phone these days. And for a fast noodle dance, I’d choose recording a video instead 😉

      Reply
    2. diane rose brown

      hello meg, is it possible to purchase fresh or frozen dough pre-made? for the arthritic or just plain lazy person? Diane

      Reply
      1. Maggie Post author

        Hi Diane, I dough you can find the fresh pre-made dough. The best way is to using a mixer (I use my KitchenAid) to knead the dough. You simply need to add the three ingredients and turn on the machine. The dough will be ready in 15 minutes.

  12. Gloria love

    I have made noodles for years ( Polish mother) but I cut them different and it is a lot of work, can’t wait to try your method, thanks so much

    Reply
  13. JANICE

    You never cease to amaze me dear Maggie…I must try this. My mom always made her own noodles (pasta) and there’s nothing to compare as to homemade. We need to open a Asian food truck! Yay! Keep up the good work my friend.

    Reply
    1. Maggie Post author

      Homemade noodles are the best aren’t they? We do need to open a Asian food truck and spread the love of noodles 🙂
      I’m glad to hear you decided to try this out. Happy cooking and have a wonderful week!

      Reply
  14. Such

    Hi! These look great and easy to try. Do they work in a stir-fry? Perhaps with some chilli oil, vinegar, soy and veggies? Or would you recommend that one eat them only in a broth? Would stir-frying ruin the texture?

    Thanks!

    Reply
    1. Maggie Post author

      The noodles are a bit more fragile than packaged noodles, so I usually don’t use them in the stir fry. You can definitely try stir fry with them, but only add them add the end and give some gentle tosses. For the vinegar, soy sauce, chili oil, and veggies combo you mentioned, you can actually make a great noodle with hot sauce (like this http://omnivorescookbook.com/biang-biang-noodles). It is almost like making a stir fry, but you mix the sauce in your bowl instead of in the pan.
      Happy cooking and let me know how the dish turns out 🙂

      Reply
  15. Dano

    Hey Maggie. What brand and kind of flour did you use? My dough never quite seems as smooth as the images, and I wonder if it’s from my elevation? I’m at 3200 feet.

    Reply
    1. Maggie Post author

      Hi Dano, I have used many brands including King Author, and the dough turned out well. If your dough is not smooth enough, it might be because you didn’t knead it long enough, or you didn’t rest it long enough. For noodle dough, if you let it rest and knead it a few times before shaping, they will eventually become smooth and tender. I’m not sure about the elevation though, since I’ve never cooked it in a place that high…

      Reply
      1. Danilo Buendia

        我唔可以做喎。I used Whitelily flour, left it in for 24 hours the first time, tried again at 48 hours, same result. When I pulled it, it broke immediately, didn’t stretch. 太乾呀。I tried another recipe that had flour, cake flour, baking soda and vegetable oil, which worked only if I pulled the dough myself for 45 minutes. 好耐。 I’m dejected, but it could be my altitude. So far, making pulled noodles at above sea level doesn’t seem easy. 好慘, 好慘呀 🙁

  16. Lucy

    Hi Maggie,

    Thanks for the recipe. Is it possible to store the noodles before cooking? Can I pull them and then coat them in cornstarch or something and then put them in the fridge? What is the best way to store them so I can cook them in the future?

    Reply
    1. Maggie Post author

      Hi Lucy, the best way to prepare ahead and cook later is to store the sliced noodle dough. After the dough is rested twice, you can cut them to small pieces and shape into balls, rub with a thin layer of vegetable oil (so they won’t stick together), then store in a airtight container in the fridge. The dough will hold for a day. If you plan to store longer, freeze the dough and thaw them in the fridge before using.
      Before cooking, return the dough to room temperature. Roll out and let some more time before pulling.
      Chinese restaurants usually use this method to prep the dough a day ahead.
      Happy cooking and hope your noodles will turn out great 🙂

      Reply
  17. Shanna Banana

    Thanks for this recipe! I am wondering what would happen if you were to change the initial resting time? Namely, how would resting it for less time change the resulting noodles? Can you explain the chemical process here?
    I ask because I started making them at 7pm, but my eyes skipped over the two hour resting time and now I have to look forward to not eating dinner until 9:30pm! T_T

    Reply
    1. Maggie Post author

      Hi Shanna, the resting time will allow the gluten to relax completely, so the dough becomes smoother and will be easier to pull. Yes you can shorten the initial resting time to 40 minutes, knead it the second time, and let the dough to rest again. The problem of short resting time will result in a very elastic dough that is difficult to pull. In this case, try to roll the dough out a bit thinner and cut to narrower noodles, it will be much easier to pull.
      I hope the noodles come out well and you won’t be starving!

      Reply
  18. Paul

    Hi Maggie,

    Great recipe. I’ve made these a couple of times and have enjoyed them thoroughly. I was wondering if you’d be able to provide advice on how to gain more control over the tenderness and level of chew the noodles have. Basically, what different steps would I need to take to give the noodles more bite, or conversely, make them silkier. Add more salt? Knead for longer? Rest overnight? Thanks in advance.

    Reply
    1. Maggie Post author

      Hi Paul, great question! To give the noodles a chewy texture, you can use less water and some salt. Although it might makes the dough a bit difficult to pull. In China street vendor adds alkaline to the dough (it is also the way Japanese restaurant makes ramen), so the dough becomes smooth and elastic, with a yellow color and easier to pull. For the alkaline method, I need to do a bit more experiment to figure out a recipe.
      Meantime, you can refer to this post: http://omnivorescookbook.com/ding-ding-chao-mian It shows a different noodle in this recipe, but you can use this dough to make hand pulled noodles as well. The result will be a chewier noodle.
      To make a silkier dough, use 1 part of all-purpose flour and 1 part pastry flour if you live in the US (the protein ratio of this blend will be similar to Chinese all-purpose flour). So the noodle will be tender by following this recipe.

      Reply
  19. Nicholas

    Hi Maggie, can I premade and roll out the noodle sheets first and store them for later use? if it is possible, how do I store them ? Can i stack them together? WIll they stick in between the sheets?

    Reply
    1. Maggie Post author

      Hi Nicholas, yes you can prepare the dough ahead. I found the easily way is to store the small round dough balls. You can grease them with vegetable oil and save them on a tray with plastic cover, so they don’t stick together. Store in the fridge, and return to room temperature before pulling. When you’re ready to cook, you can roll them out and pull the noodles directly. The noodles will be easy to stretch after a long resting time.

      Reply