15-Minute Korean Noodle Soup

This 15-minute Korean noodle soup recipe is sponsored by Pacific Foods. All opinions expressed are my own. Thank you for supporting the companies that keep this blog going.

Korean noodle soup topped with egg and baby bok choy

This 15-minute Korean noodle soup is a perfect one-pot dinner for your busy weekdays. You only need a few ingredients and some leftovers in your pantry to make this hearty dish that is bursting with flavor and loaded with nutrients. Different topping options are provided so you can DIY a custom version with whatever ingredients you have on hand!

It has been a mild winter in New York, but we’ve been enjoying lots of soup nonetheless. No matter if it’s a quick egg drop soup, an earthy hot and sour soup, or a creamy Kabocha squash soup, we put soup on the dinner table almost every single day. 

Today I want to show you one of my favorite ways to fix a quick lunch – 15-minute Korean noodle soup! It’s inspired by the Korean guksu but without the trouble of making the stock from scratch, and the result is super delicious.

Korean noodle soup with chicken, egg and baby bok choy

Ingredients you need

  • Somen noodles (or Instant Noodles without the seasoning packs)
  • Pacific Foods Organic Low Sodium Chicken Broth 
  • Kimchi, Gochujang, maple syrup, soy sauce, and garlic to make the sauce mixture
  • Baby bok choy (or any other greens you prefer)
Ingredients for making Korean noodle soup

Regular chicken broth is my go-to choice when I develop recipes, but lately I’m using more low-sodium broth in my cooking for a healthier diet. 

I love using Pacific Foods Organic Low Sodium Chicken Broth because it’s made from organic free-range chicken, has a low sodium percentage, and is very flavorful. If you compare it to some common brands, you’ll find that 1 cup of regular chicken broth usually contains a shocking 800+mg sodium, which is more than half the daily recommended sodium intake. On the other hand, the Pacific Foods low-sodium broth only contains 10mg of sodium. 

Cooking process

The cooking is so easy that you literally only need 5 minutes.

  1. Mix the sauce ingredient to make a paste
  2. Boil the noodles and veggies in the chicken broth
  3. Stir the sauce mixture into the broth until it dissolves

Stirring in the seasonings at the end, instead of cooking them, will yield a fruity and refreshing taste. It will also keep the probiotics of the kimchi alive, which provides further health benefits.

How to make Korean paste for noodle soup

Topping options

I’ve listed eggs, baby bok choy, and rotisserie chicken as topping options in my Korean noodle soup recipe. In reality, many other ingredients work as well.

For example:

  • Protein: any deli meat, leftover stew or braised meat, pan-fried shrimp and fish, fried tofu etc.
  • Veggies: various mushrooms, bamboo shoots, bean sprouts, spinach, napa cabbage etc.
Other noodle topping options

NOTE: Different veggies require various cooking times. For example, sliced white mushrooms and napa cabbage take about 5 minutes to cook through. Bean sprouts and spinach take 1 to 2 minutes.

If you do not have leftover chicken but still want to add shredded chicken, here is a quick method.

Set up a steamer. Add a small piece of raw chicken breast onto a plate and sprinkle it with a pinch of salt. Steam the chicken until it’s cooked through, 15 minutes or so. Now you have shredded chicken for your noodle soup.

Korean noodle soup close-up

More delicious one-pot meals

If you give this recipe a try, let us know! Leave a comment, rate it (once you’ve tried it), and take a picture and tag it @omnivorescookbook on Instagram! I’d love to see what you come up with.

15-Minute Korean Noodle Soup | A perfect one-pot dinner for your busy weekdays. You only need a few ingredients and some leftovers in your pantry to make this hearty dish that is bursting with flavor and loaded with nutrients. Different topping options are provided so you can DIY a custom version with whatever ingredients you have on hand!

15-Minute Korean Noodle Soup

This 15-minute Korean noodle soup is a perfect one-pot dinner for your busy weekdays. You only need a few ingredients and some leftovers in your pantry to make this hearty dish that is bursting with flavor and loaded with nutrients.
Print Pin Rate
Course: Main
Cuisine: Korean
Keyword: home style
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 5 minutes
Total Time: 15 minutes
Servings: 2 servings
Calories: 368kcal
Author: Maggie Zhu

Ingredients

Sauce

  • 1/2 cup kimchi , roughly chopped with 2 teaspoons juice
  • 2 tablespoons gochujang
  • 1 teaspoon maple syrup (or agave syrup)
  • 2 teaspoons soy sauce
  • 2 cloves garlic , grated

Soup

Topping options (see the blog post above for more options)

  • 4 heads baby bok choy , trimmed & halved
  • 2 eggs (Optional)
  • Rotisserie chicken (or other leftover meat), shredded (Optional)

Instructions

  • Combine all the sauce ingredients and set aside.
  • Bring the broth to a boil and add the noodles and bok choy. Cook for 2 minutes.
  • (Optional) You can add the egg to the broth along with the bok choy to make runny poached eggs. Alternatively, you can top the noodles with raw egg yolks. Or you can fry the eggs in a separate pan.
  • Once the broth is done cooking, add the sauce mixture and stir to incorporate.
  • Serve immediately as a main dish.

Nutrition

Serving: 1serving | Calories: 368kcal | Carbohydrates: 72.4g | Protein: 14.9g | Fat: 0.8g | Saturated Fat: 0.1g | Sodium: 2212mg | Potassium: 258mg | Fiber: 4.9g | Sugar: 4g | Calcium: 65mg | Iron: 2mg

Disclosure

Omnivore's Cookbook is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com.
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Meet Maggie

Hi I'm Maggie Zhu! Welcome to my site about modern Chinese cooking - including street food, family recipes, and restaurant dishes. I take a less labor-intensive approach while maintaining the taste and look of the dish. I am originally from Beijing, and now cook from my New York kitchen.

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5 thoughts on “15-Minute Korean Noodle Soup

  1. Kelsey Park

    This is not Korean in any which shape or form, lady…. you can’t just add kimchi to a recipe and call it Korean -a Korean person

    Reply
    1. Maggie Post author

      Hi Kelsey, I apologize if you feel the content is offensive. We borrowed the method from Korean Guksu to create the paste using Gochujang, kimchi and a few other things. We don’t have this cooking method in China and I think it’s such a great and easy way to add favor to a broth. I ended up naming it Korean noodle soup because the recipe is not really a Guksu dish. Would love to hear any suggestions if you have a better name for the dish! – Maggie

      Reply
      1. DK

        Hi, I’m also Korean, and while I wasn’t offended necessarily, this definitely isn’t a Korean dish haha. It might misguide people who aren’t familiar with Korean food to believe that this is a traditional dish. A better name for this might be ‘Korean-inspired Chinese noodles’ or something.

  2. Terri

    Maggie, I am already subscribed to your site and look forward to your recipes. I just made the 15 Minute Korean Noodle Soup and it was excellent! I will be making this soup often. I don’t care what it is called. I am curious whether your critics made this recipe before lashing out…….

    Reply