Cantonese Ground Beef Rice and Eggs (窝蛋牛肉)

4.86 from 14 votes
Email Facebook LinkedIn Mix Pinterest Reddit Twitter
This post may contain affiliate links. Read our disclosure policy.

This Cantonese ground beef rice and eggs post is sponsored by Pete and Gerry’s Organic Eggs. All opinions expressed are my own. Thank you for supporting the companies that keep this blog going.

It’s a super easy Cantonese ground beef rice bowl cooked with an oyster-sauce-based sauce, onion, green peas, and runny eggs. Top steamed rice or noodles with it to make a hearty and healthy meal. It’s also perfect to make ahead and use as meal-prep. {Gluten-Free Adaptable}

Cantonese minced beef over rice

The Cantonese ground beef and egg bowl is somewhere between Shakshuka and shepherd’s pie. It is a one-pan egg dish that is bright and bursting with flavor, so you’d feel comfortable eating it for breakfast, lunch, dinner, or any snack time in between. The sauce is made from oyster sauce and soy sauce – savory with a slight hint of sweetness. Braised with ground beef, onion, ginger, and green peas, it produces a hearty flavor that you won’t mind eating again and again.

The dish is so easy to prepare. You simply brown the ground meat, saute it with aromatics, briefly braise it in the sauce, then crack a few eggs into the pan and add some frozen peas. Instead of moving the pan into the oven, you simply need to cover the pan and let the eggs cook to your preferred texture. The prep and cooking takes about 30 minutes total. You can serve some steamed rice on the side. Start the rice right before you start the beef and they’ll both be ready at the same time.

Cantonese minced beef bowl close-up

Cantonese Ground beef rice bowl cooking notes

1. Traditional approach vs. this recipe

The traditional approach to making the Cantonese ground beef rice bowl is to marinate the beef in the sauce and cornstarch, then cook it in a wok. The marinating process is intended to eliminate the gamey taste of the beef, impart some flavor, and tenderize it a bit.

However, I found that step a bit redundant. The quality of ground beef in the US is so high that the result is great if you simply simmer the meat.

2. Top it with an egg

Many traditional recipes have you crack the eggs at the very end of the cooking, after you dish the beef onto the rice. The idea is to use the hot beef to quickly cook the egg, which forms a semi-raw texture. I personally prefer my eggs cooked to the point where the white is set and the yolk is sticky and runny. So I used a totally different approach and cooked the eggs with the beef and sauce. The end product looks a bit like shakshuka and is pretty stunning, if I do say so myself.

My default egg brand for use in daily cooking is Pete and Gerry’s Organic Eggs. I mentioned them in a previous post. In short, they are a B-Corp brand that sources fresh, high quality eggs from the small family farms they partner with, and then brings them to your grocery store. Unlike at mass-production facilities run by big corporations, their hens are truly humanely treated, and have access to fresh water and grass. As a result, you’ll notice that their eggshells are much thicker, the yolks have a more vibrant yellow color, and the egg whites have a thicker texture.

The other day I had a friend come over to cook something together. When he was cracking the eggs, he was surprised and said “Wow, the chicken that made this egg was very well-fed,”Because it took him three tries to crack the egg open. When he dropped the egg yolk into a glass cup from a height of a few inches after separating the eggs, and the yolk held its shape and didn’t break apart at all: a testament to the high quality of Pete and Gerry’s Organic Eggs.

Cantonese minced beef with rice cooked in a pan

3. How to tweak this recipe

The traditional Cantonese minced beef and eggs are usually braised with green peas. But you can use any veggies you have on hand to add some color and nutrition to your dish. For example, broccoli florets, sliced carrots, baby bok choy, and spinach all work very well. Or you can also use frozen veggie mix, frozen corn, or frozen green beans.

And of course, you can always use other types of ground meat. For example, ground chicken, ground turkey, and ground pork will work well with the sauce.

4. Ingredient replacement

The recipe uses both light soy sauce and dark soy sauce. If you only have regular soy sauce, that’s totally OK. The purpose of the dark soy sauce is to add an appetizing brown color to the dish. Replacing it with regular soy sauce won’t affect the taste, but your dish might look a bit lighter than in the pictures shown here.

You can replace the Shaoxing wine with dry sherry or even Japanese rice wine. I often get questions from readers asking if they can skip the wine to make the dish halal. You can totally replace it with more stock/broth in this recipe.

Oyster sauce is the key ingredient in the dish. In case you need to make the dish gluten-free, you can check out my homemade oyster sauce that’s made with mushrooms. You can also purchase bottled gluten-free oyster sauce.

Cantonese ground beef bowl ingredients

Cantonese minced beef and rice bowl

More easy egg recipes

Minced beef bowl cooking step-by-step

If you give this recipe a try, let us know! Leave a comment, rate it (once you’ve tried it), and take a picture and tag @omnivorescookbook and @peteandgerrys on Instagram! I’d love to see what you come up with.

Want to Know More?Receive our 5-Day Chinese Cooking Crash Course & Recipe Updates! Subscribe
Cantonese Mince Beef Rice and Eggs | A super easy Cantonese minced beef bowl cooked with an oyster-sauce-based sauce, onion, green peas, and runny eggs. Top it on steamed rice or noodles to make a hearty and healthy meal. It’s also perfect to make ahead and use as meal-prep. {Gluten-Free Adaptable}

Cantonese Ground Beef Rice and Eggs (窝蛋牛肉)

4.86 from 14 votes
It’s a super easy Cantonese minced beef bowl cooked with an oyster-sauce-based sauce, onion, green peas, and runny eggs. Top steamed rice or noodles with it to make a hearty and healthy meal. It’s also perfect to make ahead and use as meal-prep. {Gluten-Free Adaptable}
To make this dish gluten-free, use bottled gluten-free oyster sauce or homemade oyster sauce. Use dry sherry to replace Shaoxing wine. Use tamari or coconut aminos to replace light soy sauce and dark soy sauce.
Author: Maggie Zhu
Course: Main
Cuisine: Chinese
Keyword: weekday dinner
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 20 minutes
Total Time: 30 minutes
Servings: 4 servings

Ingredients

  • 1 lb (450 g) ground beef

Sauce

Cooking

Serving

  • 2 cups steamed rice

Instructions

  • Mix the sauce ingredients together in a small bowl.
  • Heat the oil in a large nonstick pan (or carbon steel paover medium heat until hot. Add the ground beef and spread it with your spatula. Let it cook without touching until the bottom is browned. Break up the beef into smaller bits.
  • Add the onions and ginger. Cook and stir occasionally, until onion turns tender and the edges are lightly browned, 5 minutes or so.
  • Pour in the sauce. Stir to mix well. Cover and simmer for 10 minutes. Your pan should still have some sauce left, just enough to cover the beef. If not, you can gradually stir in more broth.
  • Meanwhile, whisk the cornstarch with 1/4 cup of water in a small bowl.
  • Once the beef is cooked, add the frozen peas. Stir the cornstarch slurry again to dissolve the powder completely, and pour half of the slurry into the pot. Stir to mix well. The broth should thicken and will able to coat the back of a spoon. If the broth is still very thin, keep adding more cornstarch slurry to the broth and stir constantly, until it thickens.
  • Crack 5 eggs onto the beef. Cover immediately and let it steam until the egg whites are cooked and the yolks are still runny, 2 to 3 minutes. Or you can cook the eggs to the degree you prefer. Make sure the sauce doesn’t come to a full boil, which will reduce the cornstarch's ability to thicken the sauce. Move the pan off the heat for a few seconds if the pan gets too hot.
  • Once done, uncover the pan and remove it from the stove. Use a spatula or ladle to transfer the beef with an egg and some sauce onto a bowl of rice. Serve hot as a main dish.

Nutrition

Serving: 4g, Calories: 359kcal, Carbohydrates: 14.8g, Protein: 38.6g, Fat: 15.8g, Saturated Fat: 4.8g, Cholesterol: 314mg, Sodium: 1103mg, Potassium: 616mg, Fiber: 2.6g, Sugar: 6.2g, Calcium: 60mg, Iron: 19mg
Did You Make This Recipe?Don't forget the last step! Tag me @OmnivoresCookbook and #OmnivoresCookbook on Instagram!
Cantonese Ground Beef Rice and Eggs | A super easy Cantonese minced beef bowl cooked with an oyster-sauce-based sauce, onion, green peas, and runny eggs. Top it on steamed rice or noodles to make a hearty and healthy meal. It’s also perfect to make ahead and use as meal-prep. {Gluten-Free Adaptable}

Receive our FREE 5-Day Chinese Cooking Crash Course & Recipe Updates!

Subscribe

Leave a Review!

I love hearing from you! Submit your question or review below. Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked*.

Rate This Recipe!




Reader Questions and Reviews

  1. Christos says:

    Hi, Maggie
    I think that the two cups of broth was too much. To get your desired look, I had to reduce the broth for a long while befor putting in the peas and starch and eggs.
    In the end, the dish was a hit with my family

  2. Sabrina says:

    5 stars
    nice dish, love these ingredients but used to having them in separate dishes, so appreciate them together in yours, thank you for this recipe

  3. David says:

    I agree with the comment from Charistos on the amount of stock used. I’ve been simmering for 15+ minutes and have a broth, nowhere near a sauce yet. I’m wondering if maybe one cup of stock would be more suitable…

  4. Kevin says:

    5 stars
    This is awesome Maggie!!! I don’t know what happened with the previous reviewers, but I followed the recipe to the letter and the liquid is perfect at 2 C. After 10 minutes of covered simmering (I always leave a very small crack open when simmering covered), the liquid reduced to am amount just covering the beef. I’m using a 12.3″ carbon steel pan as yours appears to be as well. This recipe reminds me a lot of the Thai dish Pad Ka-Prow in its composition (and a favorite around my house), minus the heat, and similar yet very different in taste, of course. The taste of this dish is delicious, rich and hearty, great on a cold evening, and has a great depth of flavor without being spicy. I’ve still yet to leave a review on the Char Siu Chow Mein, coming shortly (so good!!!), and dozens of other dishes I’ve made from your amazing recipes. Thanks again Maggie, still hoping for hardcover books at some point, I think it’s your destiny, immortalized in perpetuity with hard covers right next to the other great cooks!!

  5. Kevin says:

    5 stars
    This is awesome Maggie!!! I don’t know what happened with the previous reviewers, but I followed the recipe to the letter and the liquid is perfect at 2 C. After 10 minutes of covered simmering (I always leave a very small crack open when simmering covered), the liquid reduced to am amount just covering the beef. I’m using a 12.3″ carbon steel pan as yours appears to be as well.

    This recipe reminds me a lot of the Thai dish Pad Ka-Prow in its composition (and a favorite around my house), minus the heat, and similar yet very different in taste, of course. The taste of this dish is delicious, rich and hearty, great on a cold evening, and has a great depth of flavor without being spicy. I’ve still yet to leave a review on the Char Siu Chow Mein, coming shortly (so good!!!), and dozens of other dishes I’ve made from your amazing recipes. Thanks again Maggie, still hoping for hardcover books at some point, I think it’s your destiny, immortalized in perpetuity with hard covers right next to the other great cooks!! 🙂

  6. John says:

    5 stars
    Family loved it even those who usually don’t like soy sauce based meals.

  7. HC says:

    4 stars
    Recipe was delicious, but it was quite salty, and there was too much broth. I had to boil it down to reduce it. Next time, I think I will use only one cup of broth and salt-free or homemade chicken stock next time. My father (who is Cantonese) prefers his minced beef with some ketchup. 🙂 Also a delicious addition!

  8. Sooyoung Jung says:

    5 stars
    I loved this! Just found your recipes and after trying your chicken udon (and it being an amazing success) I decided to try this out for dinner. It was amazing!!! I feel like the salt levels were riding the line between salty and perfectly seasoned, but otherwise this dish is so comforting. The flavors may be simple, but something about a warm bowl of runny yolk and lucious sauce is so warming on a gloomy day 🙂 I saw the comments that others had on there being too much stock- I think this has to do with how wide of a pan you use. I used a relatively large pan that gave the sauce more surface area. Nevertheless, I did keep this on the stove for about 7 minutes more than the 10 advised to get the consistency I wanted. Be patient and watch the heat! Listen to the author’s advice about keeping the heat from getting too hot to help the cornstarch do its thing.

  9. Iain says:

    5 stars
    A rich, hearty, tasty comfort food dish. Basic ingredients that I had never tried together before – and it works! I added pickled chillis, went heavy on the ginger and served it with coriander and spring onion garnish, and was pleased with the result.

  10. Nicole says:

    5 stars
    Excellent recipe. I did reduce the chicken broth to one cup. I added a bit more white pepper and ginger but that’s just because of preference. I love how easy the dish and and how’s it’s such a comfort meal.

  11. Yvonne To says:

    I find that if I “marinate” or pre-mix the ground beef with the soy sauce, sugar, wine, and corn starch prior to cooking, the meat is more tender and does not dry out and become gritty. The corn starch binds the meat and holds onto its moisture. I also use about half of the corn starch this way. I also cooked the aromatics first (ginger, garlic and onions) and added some diced carrots before adding the marinated ground beef, cooking at medium high to high. Once the meat is mostly cooked, I added about 1 cup of broth and simmered it after it boiled. I think a little tomato paste/ketchup (acid) would round out the flavors nicely. I also cooked the dish with some rendered beef fat from rendang beef so that it is mildly spicy.

    • Maggie says:

      Thanks so much for sharing the tip Yvonne! Totally agree with you that marinating the ground beef will add a better texture and taste. I used to do that more often but I skip the step these days to shorten the prepping time. It’s a great practice when you have some extra time in the kitchen 🙂

  12. Alisia says:

    going to attempt this tonight – looks fab

  13. Lillian Yang says:

    5 stars
    Great recipe! Thank you for sharing Maggie !! Instead of Shaoxing wine, I replaced it with white rice wine and it worked well! The one mistake I made was not removing the pan off the stove immediately after the egg was done cooking. My family weren’t ready to eat by the time the dish was done so the egg was over cooked ( no runny egg yolk =\ ) but other than that, it tasted amazing! I added some Japanese Furikake, and it was great with some Sriracha too!

  14. Alessandra Isgro says:

    4 stars
    this was so yummy!!! – we used pork instead of beef, so i will definitely try it with beef

    we would love to experiment with the sauce, maybe some spice/ curry spice

  15. Kadi Startup says:

    5 stars
    Very easy and quick , not too much broth at all as some reviewers said, but I also added one leek and a small Pok Choi. Garnished with spring onion and chilli flakes. Delish midweek meal! Thank you !

  16. angela howard says:

    5 stars
    Very simple and very delicious!
    Thankyou so much!

  17. Alicia B. says:

    This was awesome! Added a couple splashed of fish sauce and sambal to the sauce mixture, garnished with green onion. Added to the weeknight dinner rotation. Your site and recipes are amazing!

  18. Julie says:

    5 stars
    My family loved this dish. One tip is to make sure the chicken stock is unsalted. My dish came out salty because I forgot about the salt in the chicken stock, but I added more water and it turned out really delicious! Thank you for sharing this recipe.

  19. Kate says:

    5 stars
    Thank you for sharing. This dish has become a staple in our home 💕

Omnivore's Cookbook: Make Chinese Cooking Easy
BuzzFeedGood HousekeepingHuffington PostLucky ChowMSNReader's DigestSaveurYahoo! News

FREE 5-Day Chinese Cooking Crash Course

Cooking delicous Chinese food is easier than you think!

Thank

You!

USE COUPON CODE 

WELCOME20

Follow us on Facebook