Chinese Deviled Eggs

This Chinese deviled eggs recipe is sponsored by Pete and Gerry’s Organic Eggs. All opinions expressed are my own. Thank you for supporting the companies that keep this blog going.

Give a holiday classic a surprising twist with these Chinese deviled eggs that are bursting with exciting flavors to shake things up! {Gluten-Free}

Chinese style deviled eggs

Do you love deviled eggs? I do too! They are such a classic for all the holidays and get togethers. But here, I have created Chinese deviled eggs. And you don’t have to wait until the holidays to enjoy them!

These Chinese deviled eggs are super easy to put together. They use very simple ingredients that lead to bold and flavorful results. My secret ingredients are wasabi mayo and Chinese pickles. They give the yolk filling a creamy texture and a nice spicy kick with fun crunchy bits. Along with sprinkled chili flakes and green onions, you get even more depth of flavor. That’s what makes these Chinese deviled eggs so unique.

Ingredients for making deviled eggs
Deviled eggs close up

Egg quality matters

Because eggs are the star of this recipe, I encourage you to use high quality eggs. You really do get the best taste when you use the best ingredients. I used Pete and Gerry’s Organic Eggs for my Chinese deviled eggs. You can really taste the difference with these organic eggs because Pete and Gerry’s partner farms produce them the same way eggs were farmed ages ago. There are no antibiotics, GMOs, or pesticides used. Pete and Gerry’s Organic Eggs are a sustainable choice too, so you can feel good about what you’re eating, inside and out.

Chinese deviled eggs

Chinese deviled eggs Cooking process

Boil the eggs

The key is to boil the eggs until they just reach the hard-boiled texture without overcooking them. Otherwise the egg yolks will be tough and rubbery. 

To get the egg yolks positioned in the center of the egg white, stir the water in a circular motion the first minute the eggs are boiling. 

Peeling hard boiled eggs

Prepare the filling

I used Chinese pickled mustard greens to add a crunchy texture to the egg yolk. Although you can garnish the eggs with them at the end, I prefer to chop some and mix them into the yolk filling. 

NOTE: if you plan to use a pastry pipe to fill the eggs, you need to chop the pickles into very small pieces so they can go through the piping tip.

Chop Zha Cai

To scoop out the egg yolk, you can simply use a small spoon.

Making deviled eggs

Once you have all the yolks in a bowl, smash them into fine pieces. Then add the wasabi and mayo and beat it until it’s smooth. Fold in the pickles at the end.

NOTE: you can use a spatula to mix the filling. If you want to simplify the process, an immersion blender will work as well. Just make sure not to over beat the mayonnaise – otherwise it might separate. 

Making deviled eggs filling

During this process, you should taste the filling and adjust the texture by adding more mayonnaise if needed. I personally prefer to keep the eggs and mayonnaise balanced. But you might like to make your deviled eggs extra creamy by adding more mayo or perhaps a bit spicier by adding more wasabi.

Fill the eggs

You can simply scoop the filling into a ziplock bag and cut off one corner, then squeeze the mixture out to fill each of the eggs.

If you want the result extra pretty, I highly recommend you use a pastry bag with a large closed star tip. Do note, if you do plan to use a pastry bag, you might want to blend in a bit more mayo just so the filling will come out smoothly.

Once I’m done filling the eggs, I like to garnish them with some chili pepper and chopped onions. You can also add a small drizzle of your favorite hot sauce onto the eggs.

Filling deviled eggs
Process of making deviled eggs

Afterthoughts

When eggs are the center of the recipe, they really need to be the best eggs you can get. You’ll see, even when you eat them plain, how much more delicious they are. 

For now, these Chinese deviled eggs will wow your guests with these flavors. With only seven ingredients and less than 20 minutes total needed to make them, they’re one of the best dishes you can make for the holidays, or just for something special to treat yourself!

These deviled eggs are the best when served fresh, but if you have any leftovers, you can store them in a sealed container in the fridge for up to 2 days.

Deviled eggs garnished with chili flakes and green onions

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Give a holiday classic a surprising twist with these Chinese deviled eggs that are bursting with exciting flavors to shake things up! {Gluten-Free}

Chinese Deviled Eggs

Give a holiday classic a surprising twist with these Chinese deviled eggs that are bursting with exciting flavors to shake things up! {Gluten-Free}
5 from 1 vote
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Course: Appetizer
Cuisine: Chinese
Keyword: holiday cooking
Prep Time: 5 minutes
Cook Time: 12 minutes
Total Time: 17 minutes
Servings: 6 (12 deviled eggs)
Calories: 112kcal
Author: Maggie Zhu

Ingredients

  • 6 extra large Pete and Gerry’s Organic Eggs (Footnote 1)
  • 5 tablespoons mayonnaise (or to taste)
  • 1 heaping teaspoon wasabi or Chinese hot mustard (or to taste)
  • 1/4 teaspoon rice vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons zha cai Chinese pickled mustard greens, diced (Optional) (Footnote 2)
  • 1 green onion , thinly sliced
  • Chinese chili flakes (or your favorite chili sauce)

Instructions

  • To boil the eggs, fill a pot with enough water to cover the eggs. Bring the water to a boil, then slowly lower the eggs using a ladle. Boil for 12 minutes, stirring the water in a circular motion with a spoon for the first minute (to keep the egg yolk in the center). Once the eggs are done, run them under cold tap water to stop cooking.
  • Once the eggs are cooled, peel them and slice them in half lengthwise.
  • Gently pop out the cooked yolks into a big bowl using a small spoon. Mash them with the backside of a spoon. Make sure to mash them as finely as you can, so the finished filling will be smooth.
  • Add the mayonnaise, wasabi or mustard, and rice vinegar to the bowl. Mix with a spatula (or an immersion blender) just until it forms a smooth paste. You can adjust the taste by adding more mayo, wasabi, or vinegar.
  • Add the zha cai pickles, if using. Mix again to distribute throughout the yolk mixture.
  • Transfer the yolk mixture to a piping bag with a large star tip, or a small ziplock bag with a corner cut off.
  • Pipe the yolks into the halved egg white cups.
  • Garnish the eggs with chili flakes (or hot sauce) and green onions. Serve as an appetizer.
  • These eggs can be made ahead of time and stored in the fridge in a sealed container for up to 2 days. For the best result, you should serve them the same day you cooked them.

Notes

  1. I prefer to use larger eggs for deviled eggs because they’re easier to work with. You can use any other size you prefer, but be sure to adjust other ingredients according to your taste.
  2. The pickles are optional but highly recommended. They add a great texture to the eggs and make them taste better. If you do not have the Chinese pickles, you can use regular pickled cucumbers or any pickles that have a crunchy texture.

Nutrition

Serving: 1serving | Calories: 112kcal | Carbohydrates: 3.6g | Protein: 5.7g | Fat: 8.5g | Saturated Fat: 2g | Cholesterol: 167mg | Sodium: 149mg | Potassium: 73mg | Fiber: 0.1g | Sugar: 1.2g | Calcium: 28mg | Iron: 1mg

If you give this recipe a try, let us know! Leave a comment, rate it (once you’ve tried it), and take a picture and tag it @omnivorescookbook on Instagram! I’d love to see what you come up with.

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Meet Maggie

Hi I'm Maggie Zhu! Welcome to my site about modern Chinese cooking - including street food, family recipes, and restaurant dishes. I take a less labor-intensive approach while maintaining the taste and look of the dish. I am originally from Beijing, and now cook from my New York kitchen.

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