Seafood Tofu Stew

Seafood Tofu Stew | omnivorescookbook.com

Seafood tofu stew is hearty, rich, and packed with nutrition. The soft and silky tofu is braised in a scrumptious chicken soup that is further enhanced by shrimp and scallops. The soup is buttery, rich, and abundant with goodies. It has a savory taste that is balanced by the light sweetness of the carrots and peas. One serving contains only 200 calories and the whole thing takes 30 minutes to prepare. What a perfect comfort dish for a cold winter day!

Beijing is getting colder every day and moving quickly toward winter. When a light jacket and thin sweater cannot protect me from the chilling wind, I start to crave hot stew and soup. I really like the seafood stew served at a nearby Chinese restaurant. Last weekend, I decided to recreate this dish at home.

Seafood Tofu Stew | omnivorescookbook.com

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The idea of the soup is really simple. You just need a rich chicken broth to make the soup base, some frozen seafood to add flavor, and a pack of soft tofu to take the lead role. When I made the dish at home, I slightly altered it by adding mushrooms and some colorful veggies to make it even healthier and look better in photos. The veggies added a nice sweetness and the mushrooms made the dish near perfect, which I wasn’t expecting.

My boyfriend was coming to Beijing to visit the week I made the stew. When I showed (read: showed off) the stew picture to him, he loved the idea and immediately asked me to make it for his first dinner. After a 14-hour flight, with 13 hours’ time difference of jet lag, what could be more comforting than a hot, hearty stew?

Seafood Tofu Stew | omnivorescookbook.com

The truth is, the first time I cooked the dish at home, I took a shortcut and used chicken bouillon powder. The soup tasted great and I loved it. But when making it for my boyfriend, I decided to try it with the real deal chicken stock instead. So, I went to shop for a high grade free range whole chicken over the weekend and made a very condensed chicken stock. I made the stew again with the same recipe, only replacing the chicken bouillon with chicken broth. The result was AMAZING!

It was so amazing that even I was surprised at the result! Can you imagine a soup very dense in texture, with a semi-opaque color, without adding any cornstarch to thicken the soup? I need to start using real chicken stock instead of chicken bouillon powder in every dish I make from now on!

Seafood Tofu Stew | omnivorescookbook.com

A Few Quick Tips for Cooking This Dish

  • Coat the seafood in a thin layer of cornstarch – this will help the seafood stay tender during cooking without drying out. If you don’t like cornstarch, though, simply skip it.
  • Stir fry the seafood and veggies before adding them into the soup – this will eliminate the fishy smell, enhance the flavor of the stew, and quicken the braising process. It may sound like a bit of a hassle, but is really worth the time.
  • Use the right size pot – says Julia Child. In this case, use a 1.4-liter (1.5-quart) baby dutch oven, as it can just hold everything.
  • Choose soft or silken tofu. The stew will be finished in a short period of time, so a softer tofu will make for better texture and flavor. You can use a small knife to cut the tofu while is is in the package, and add it into the pot directly. Use a wooden spatula to stir the stew after seasoning. This way, the tofu will hold its shape well through the braising process.
  • Use real chicken stock. This really makes a difference. But if you don’t have chicken broth, using chicken bouillon powder will work too.
  • Add a spoonful of grease from the top of the chicken stock, if you have any. Of course it will add a few calories to the dish, but chicken grease contains a very condensed flavor and it will thicken the soup once emulsified.
  • Add enough salt, preferably sea salt, until the broth tastes a bit salty by itself. If you have a spoonful of soup with tofu, seafood and veggies, it should taste just right.

I’m getting hungry all over again, just writing this post. I’ll stop here today and head to the kitchen! What should I cook the next? Come back soon to check out my next recipe! 🙂

Seafood Tofu Stew | omnivorescookbook.com

Print

Seafood Tofu Stew


  • Author: Maggie Zhu
  • Prep Time: 10 mins
  • Cook Time: 20 mins
  • Total Time: 30 mins
  • Yield: 2-4
  • Category: Main
  • Cuisine: Chinese

Description

This recipe yields 2 servings as main and 4 servings as side.


Ingredients

  • 250 grams (9 ounces) mixed seafood (about 1 and 1/2 cup shrimp, scallops and / or squid)
  • salt and pepper
  • 1 teaspoon cornstarch
  • 2 teaspoons vegetable oil
  • 1 teaspoon sliced ginger
  • 2 tablespoons chopped green onion
  • (optional) 1 cup mixed diced carrot and peas
  • 1 pack 450 grams (1 pound) soft tofu, cubed
  • 1 cup shimeji mushroom (or other preferred type)
  • 2 cups chicken stock (or 1 teaspoon chicken bouillon and 2 cups water)

Instructions

  1. Dry mixed seafood with a paper towel. Place seafood in a small bowl, lightly season with salt and pepper, and mix well. Add cornstarch, mix well, and allow to sit at room temperature for 10 minutes.
    Seafood Tofu Stew Cooking Process | omnivorescookbook.com Seafood Tofu Stew Cooking Process | omnivorescookbook.com
  2. While marinating the seafood, prepare the vegetables.
  3. Heat vegetable oil in a non-stick skillet. When oil is warm, add ginger and green onion. Stir a few times, until fragrant. Add carrot and peas, stir for 2 minutes, until the veggies are half cooked through. Add seafood and stir until the surface is cooked, about 1 minute. Stop heat.
    Seafood Tofu Stew Cooking Process | omnivorescookbook.com Seafood Tofu Stew Cooking Process | omnivorescookbook.com Seafood Tofu Stew Cooking Process | omnivorescookbook.com
  4. In a 2-quart dutch oven, carefully spread the tofu on the bottom. Transfer the seafood and vegetables onto the tofu. Add chicken broth. Bring to a boil over medium high heat. Turn to low heat. Simmer, covered, for 10 minutes. Add salt and black pepper to taste. The broth should taste slightly salty by itself, but just right when eaten with the tofu.
    Seafood Tofu Stew Cooking Process | omnivorescookbook.com Seafood Tofu Stew Cooking Process | omnivorescookbook.com
  5. Serve warm.

The nutrition facts are calculated based on 1 of the 4 servings generated by the recipe.

Seafood Tofu Stew Nutrition Facts | omnivorescookbook.com

Disclosure

Omnivore's Cookbook is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com.
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Meet Maggie

Hi I'm Maggie Zhu! Welcome to my site about modern Chinese cooking - including street food, family recipes, and restaurant dishes. I take a less labor-intensive approach while maintaining the taste and look of the dish. I am originally from Beijing, and now cook from my Austin, Texas kitchen.

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9 thoughts on “Seafood Tofu Stew

  1. Tim

    Maggie, I want to thank you so much for this website and all the recipes and links to things like different Asian spices. I have always loved Asian food and now that I am disabled, and have found you, I’m going to try my hand at several of your dishes.
    I read your story on the Braised Pig Feet recipe, and just had to tell you. I grew up in the South and we were poor, although we kids didn’t know it till some other well to do kids pointed that out to us in a snob kind of way. Anyway we raised a lot of what we ate, and I didn’t know I was Chinese…smile not really, but we ate all of the critter to. We enjoyed chicken feet in our dumplings with necks and backs. And I grew up loving pig intestine, and dishes like liver & lytes (pork liver and lung cooked in a gravy) hog head cheese(souse) and all those good things.
    Thanks again, and happy cooking, your new friend Tim

    Reply
    1. Maggie Post author

      Hi Tim, thanks so much for stopping by and leaving the kind words!
      It’s interesting that different cultures share so many similarities. The dishes you described really sound like Chinese food 🙂
      Until now, people around me still like eating chicken feet and necks, and any part from pig, no matter in the big city or poorer area. I didn’t eat those too often, but I have a few favorite dishes like the braised pig feet and chicken head (sounds freaky enough?). It’s interesting that we also have a dish of pork liver and lung too (super delicious one!), but it’s a salad that’s drizzled with hot sauce. I should share that one on my blog some time!
      Hope my recipes will be helpful and happy cooking!

      Reply
  2. Kelly

    This soup looks so comforting and delicious! I love simple and clear broth soups like this that are full of flavor 🙂 It’s been really cold here too so a big bowl of soup sounds perfect!

    Reply
  3. Stuart

    Made this earlier in the week and it’s great. Goes together quickly and very tasty. Had the other half of it last night: warmed me right up. Thanks Ms. Zhu, please keep up the great work. (Wish I knew how to attach my picture here).

    Reply
  4. Airish

    Hi Ms. Maggie! Can I use seafood tofu in this dish? Is it okay if I add broccoli too?
    I would like to try and cook this on weekend but I am not an expert so your advise would mean a lot to me.

    Thank you so much!

    Reply