Cha Siu Kebab 叉烧肉 (Chinese BBQ)

Cha Siu kebab (Chinese BBQ) - Chinese BBQ + smokiness from charcoal = perfection. The recipe includes ways to cook chicken and pork. You can choose to make kebabs or use bigger cuts of meat. | omnivorescookbook.comChinese Cha Siu is super delicious. Cha Siu cooked on a charcoal grill is divine! The meat is beautifully charred with a shiny glaze. You can smell the wonderful smoky aroma from afar. The kebab style BBQ is the best choice for your summer grilling party. It cooks very quickly and is addictively tasty.

Cha siu kebabs came onto my radar about two weeks ago in a conversation I had with Paulina, a reader from Russia. She told me that instead of cooking traditional style BBQ pork, her family usually does a Russian style barbecue – shashlik, cooked on a manghal. The manghal is like a mini version of the American barbeque grill, fueled by charcoal and used exclusively for cooking kebabs.

I found this idea very intriguing. Manghal is quite like the Chinese grilling pit used to cook lamb skewers, one of the most popular street foods in China. It gives the meat a great smoky flavor that you can’t get from an oven or gas grill.

When Paulina shared her family’s favorite BBQ pork kebab recipe, I knew I had to try it out! It looked SO good. Plus, it was a perfect opportunity to do some grilling – Thomas could help me with prep and start the fire, and we have several public grills located near the house.

Besides the kebab-style cooking, I tried out a few more things, including whole bone-in chicken thighs, chicken thigh skewers, chicken wings, and bigger cuts of pork shoulder. I have included cooking notes for all of those in the recipe below.

Cha Siu kebab (Chinese BBQ) - Chinese BBQ + smokiness from charcoal = perfection. The recipe includes ways to cook chicken and pork. You can choose to make kebabs or use bigger cuts of meat. | omnivorescookbook.com

Our grilling party didn’t go so smoothly the first time. We marinated the meat and prepared to grill it on Memorial Day. However, after 30 minutes of grilling, it started to rain extremely heavily and continued all day. We got to cook all the pork kebabs, but we couldn’t finish cooking the pork shoulder or chicken thighs.

The pork kebabs turned out perfectly. The surface of the meat was beautifully charred, with a super moist texture. They cooked extremely quickly, many times faster than bigger cuts. I found them to be a perfect snack for a party.

The pork shoulder and chicken thighs were halfway cooked when it started to rain. So we had to continue cooking them in the oven. But since they had been cooked partially on the grill, they still had a very nice smoky flavor.

Cha Siu kebab (Chinese BBQ) - Chinese BBQ + smokiness from charcoal = perfection. The recipe includes ways to cook chicken and pork. You can choose to make kebabs or use bigger cuts of meat. | omnivorescookbook.comCha Siu kebab (Chinese BBQ) - Chinese BBQ + smokiness from charcoal = perfection. The recipe includes ways to cook chicken and pork. You can choose to make kebabs or use bigger cuts of meat. | omnivorescookbook.comLast weekend, we did the whole process all over again. Luckily the weather was perfect – sunny, cool and windy. We got a huge batch of marinated meat prepared, with more variety this time. I’m so glad we tried it again. We experienced a bit more trial and error as we perfected the grilling process.

Cha Siu kebab (Chinese BBQ) - Chinese BBQ + smokiness from charcoal = perfection. The recipe includes ways to cook chicken and pork. You can choose to make kebabs or use bigger cuts of meat. | omnivorescookbook.comCha Siu kebab (Chinese BBQ) - Chinese BBQ + smokiness from charcoal = perfection. The recipe includes ways to cook chicken and pork. You can choose to make kebabs or use bigger cuts of meat. | omnivorescookbook.com

There were a few cooking notes:

– If you’re hosting a party, definitely try the kebab style BBQ. It cooks so much more quickly and is a much easier method for generating super moist meat.

– Start a fire that is not too strong, you should able to cook the kebabs all the way through over direct heat without burning the meat (the glaze on the meat should burn/caramelize a bit, though).

– Do not cut the meat into smaller cubes before marinating. It causes the meat to dry out. I tried both ways. Although you need more marinating time, using bigger cuts of meat in the marinating stage generates much tastier, moister meat.

– If you’re cooking larger cuts of meat, make sure to pile the charcoal on one side of the grill. You will need to move the meat to the indirect heat side after the surface is charred.

– The seasoning in this recipe is toward the savory end of the BBQ spectrum. If you have a sweeter tooth, add more honey into the marinade.

– Definitely try cooking with chicken, too. It’s a bit similar to teriyaki chicken, only with a great smoky flavor. I prefer thighs and wings, because they yield a very moist texture. You could use chicken breasts, too.

Do you like Chinese style BBQ? If yes, definitely try cooking it over charcoal. The smokiness adds extra points to the BBQ and makes it so addictive!

Cha Siu kebab (Chinese BBQ) - Chinese BBQ + smokiness from charcoal = perfection. The recipe includes ways to cook chicken and pork. You can choose to make kebabs or use bigger cuts of meat. | omnivorescookbook.comCha Siu kebab (Chinese BBQ) - Chinese BBQ + smokiness from charcoal = perfection. The recipe includes ways to cook chicken and pork. You can choose to make kebabs or use bigger cuts of meat. | omnivorescookbook.com

4.9 from 7 reviews
Cha Siu Kebab 叉烧肉 (Chinese BBQ)
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
The recipe was shared by Paulina Golovanova.
The cooking time of this recipe depends on the type of meat you cook. You can finish cooking in 30 minute if you cook the kebab style. If you are cooking bigger cut of meat, the cooking time will be longer, in about 1 hour.
Author:
Recipe type: Main, Snack
Cuisine: Chinese
Serves: 8-10 skewers
Ingredients
For the BBQ sauce
  • 3 tablespoons hoisin sauce
  • 3 tablespoons oyster sauce
  • 3 tablespoons Shaoxing wine
  • 3 tablespoons honey (4 tablespoons for a sweeter taste)
  • 2 tablespoons light soy sauce (3 tablespoons light soy sauce for a saltier taste)
  • 1 tablespoon dark soy sauce
  • 1 teaspoon sesame oil
  • 1 teaspoon white pepper
  • 1/4 teaspoon five spice powder
  • 1/8 teaspoon chili flakes
  • 3 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 1/2 thumb ginger, minced
  • 8 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 kilogram (2 1/4 pounds) meat (options: pork shoulder, pork neck, chicken thigh, chicken breast, wings) (*see footnote 1)
Special equipment:
  • Bamboo skewers (or metal skewers)
Instructions
To marinate the meat
  1. Combine all ingredients for the BBQ sauce except the vegetable oil, ginger, and garlic in a bowl and mix well.
  2. Heat vegetable oil in a saucepan over medium heat until warm. Turn to low heat. Add ginger and garlic. Cook and stir a few times until fragrant. Add the BBQ sauce. Cook and stir until the texture becomes smooth, 1 to 2 minutes.
    Cha Siu Kebab Cooking Process | omnivorescookbook.com Cha Siu Kebab Cooking Process | omnivorescookbook.com
  3. Transfer the sauce to a bowl to cool.
  4. Add meat to a ziplock bag and 2/3 of the sauce (*see footnote 2). Press the air out of the bag and seal it. Give the bag a good massage, so that the sauce covers the meat evenly.
    Cha Siu Kebab Cooking Process | omnivorescookbook.com Cha Siu Kebab Cooking Process | omnivorescookbook.com
  5. Save the rest of the sauce in an airtight container and place it in the fridge. You will use it for the glaze later.
  6. Marinate meat in the fridge for 24 hours.
To prepare barbecue
  1. (Optional) If using bamboo skewers, soak 8 skewers in water for 15 minutes.
  2. Transfer the meat to a plate and discard the marinade.
  3. If you are cooking pork or chicken skewers, transfer the meat to a cutting board and cut it into bite sized cubes (about 1 inches / 2.5 centimeters). (*see footnote 3)
  4. Thread the meat onto the bamboo or metal skewers.
    Cha Siu Kebab Cooking Process | omnivorescookbook.com
  5. Add charcoal to one end of the grill and start a fire. When the coals are evenly lit, close the grill and allow it to warm up.
To cook skewers
  1. Place meat skewers on the direct heat (i.e. above the coals) and close the lid to cook, until nicely charred on the bottom, 2 to 3 minutes. Brush glaze on the meat. Turn meat to cook the other side. Close the lid and let cook for another 2 to 3 minutes. If the meat is getting burned, move the skewers to the other side of the grill (the one with no coals under it) and close the lid. Keep cooking over indirect heat until cooked through.
    Cha Siu Kebab Cooking Process | omnivorescookbook.com Cha Siu Kebab Cooking Process | omnivorescookbook.com
  2. Serve warm.
To cook bigger cuts of meat
  1. Place marinated pork shoulder or chicken thigh over direct heat and cook until nicely charred, about 5 minutes per side. Brush glaze on the meat. Move the meat to the indirectly heated side, cover the grill, and allow to cook. Check on the meat every 5 minutes and brush with glaze. Cook until a thermometer inserted into the center of the meat reads 150 to 160 F degrees (65 to 70 C) for pork, and 165 F (74 C) for chicken, about 30 minutes.
    Cha Siu Kebab Cooking Process | omnivorescookbook.com Cha Siu Kebab Cooking Process | omnivorescookbook.com
  2. Transfer the meat to a plate and let rest for 5 minutes.
  3. Serve warm.
  4. Save the leftovers in an airtight container for up to 1 week in the fridge or up to 1 month in the freezer.
Notes
1. For cooking larger cuts of pork shoulder, I used a strip that was about 20cm (8”) in length and 4cm (1.5” in width). It cooked faster than a whole piece and yielded more flavorful meat.
2. Do not cut the meat into small pieces when marinating. It causes the meat to dry out during cooking.
3. You can cook chicken skewers by using boneless skinless thighs, chicken breasts, or wings. For wings, thread onto skewers without cutting.

The nutrition facts are calculated based on 1 of the 10 skewers generated by this recipe.

Cha Siu Kebab Nutrition Facts | omnivorescookbook.com

Disclosure

Omnivore's Cookbook is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com.
Share:
Meet Maggie

Hi I'm Maggie Zhu! Welcome to my site about modern Chinese cooking - including street food, family recipes, and restaurant dishes. I take a less labor-intensive approach while maintaining the taste and look of the dish. I am originally from Beijing, and now cook from my Austin, Texas kitchen.

Never Miss a Recipe!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Rate this recipe:  

19 thoughts on “Cha Siu Kebab 叉烧肉 (Chinese BBQ)

  1. Whitney

    Oh my god. I’m dying over here. This looks Aaaahmazing. If it’s anything like Korean bbq (which is my absolute favorite) I’m SO in!

    Reply
  2. Kevin | KevinIsCooking

    Man oh man these are just mouth watering pics! So tempting right now and I just ate some fresh shrimp for lunch with family visiting in town. Love the hoisin, oyster sauce, 5 Spice blend in your BBQ sauce, too!

    Reply
  3. Monica

    Looks amazing and what a journey you had in experimenting and perfecting the recipe! (It always threatens to rain when we plan to have people over when we barbecue!) Thanks for sharing your tips. Looks delicious and I bet it tastes even better the next day!

    Reply
  4. Bam's Kitchen

    Brilliant Recipe Maggie!!! My boys love Char Sui Fan but did not want to be firing up the oven in hot and humid Hong Kong. Love that marinade… delicious and great photos. Sharing and pinning everywhere, of course! Hmm I want to give your recipe 5 stars but it will only go to the 4 star mark… It is a 5 star recipe all the way. Take Care, BAM

    Reply
  5. [email protected]

    Oh Maggie. I love that you got this idea from a reader! And the pics are amazing – check out those licks of flame! I love it!! thank you for the extensive notes, I find that grilling is an art especially withs tick marinades like this. 🙂

    Oh and it reminds me we had a yakitori dinner at my mum’s last weekend and cooked over charcoal so I have lots of fire licking pics too!! Wish I could upload pics in the comments section to show you.

    I adore this recipe! Pinning! (And making it for my next Asian BBQ!!) 🙂

    Reply
  6. Soe

    “Do not cut the meat into smaller cubes before marinating. It causes the meat to dry out. I tried both ways. Although you need more marinating time, using bigger cuts of meat in the marinating stage generates much tastier, moister meat.”
    I did not know about this trick at all. Thanks for sharing 😀

    Reply
    1. Maggie Post author

      I got this idea from a Japanese Ramen restaurant. When I ordered cha-shu ramen, I found they used BBQ chicken and it was so tasty! I felt the same, why I never thought about it?

      Reply
    1. Maggie Post author

      Half thumb ginger is about 1 tablespoon, or a chunk of ginger that measures 2″ (5cm) long, 1″ (2.5cm) wide, and 1/2″ (1/2 cm) deep.

      Reply
  7. [email protected]

    I came to your site to come back and say that I made these for a family BBQ last weekend. O. M. G.

    You ROCK!!! I LOVE YOUR FOOD!!! (And so does my entire extended family) We made it on a yakitori grill!

    Reply
  8. Vic

    When making shashlic, I sumtimes add a mashed Kiwi fruit a s a tenderiser. Works well. Bi carb of soda works well too. I believe the Chinese use bi carb as a tenderiser in ‘sizzling steak’. Shashlic also uses milk as a tenderiser. I once used Kiwi fruit and bi carb together when I made shashlik using wild goat. Turned out too soft for me. As for the Chinese version, sounds so good I will definately be trying it soon.

    Reply
    1. Maggie Post author

      Hi Vic, yes many Chinese restaurants use baking soda to marinate the meat (have to wash them off before cooking), to tenderize it and gives it the blistered surface. However I personally do not like adding too much chemical for cooking daily meals. So I actually like kiwi method better! In Chinese cooking we usually use ginger to tenderize the meat, since it has the enzyme (like in kiwi) as well.
      Happy cooking and let me know how the dish turns out 🙂

      Reply