5-Ingredient Baked Chicken Thigh

These baked thighs are perfect for a weekday dinner. All you need is: five minutes active cooking time, five ingredients, and 30 minutes baking time to get the juiciest texture with crispy skin. No brining or broiling required.

5-Ingredient Baked Chicken Thigh - Perfect for a weekday dinner. All you need is: five minutes active cooking time, five ingredients, and 30 minutes baking time to get the juiciest texture with crispy skin. No brining or broiling required.

Sometimes simplicity is the best. Like this five-ingredient baked chicken thigh I invented the other day.

As a person who loves chicken dishes and couldn’t get tired of them, ever, even if served every single day, I’m constantly searching for easier and faster methods to cook chicken, so I can serve it even more often for our weekday dinners! My goal is always the same – juicy chicken with crispy skin.

Crispy chicken skin is my obsession. I won’t even order a chicken dish if it does not have skin on. Of course you could ignore me if you want to cook this recipe with skinless thighs. They work, too. For the best results, bone-in and skin-on is the only way to go.

Also, do use organic chicken when possible. Organic chicken typically has thinner skin that crisps up perfectly. Avoid the bone-in thighs that have a thick, duck-like skin. This way, you can enjoy a better tasting dish without worrying about your cholesterol or fat intake.

5-Ingredient Baked Chicken Thigh - Perfect for a weekday dinner. All you need is: five minutes active cooking time, five ingredients, and 30 minutes baking time to get the juiciest texture with crispy skin. No brining or broiling required.

This recipe was inspired by two of my older recipes – Chicken A La Benson and Oven Baked Wings. The former recipe uses plenty of red wine and chicken stock to submerge the lower part of the thighs, to keep the chicken juicy, infuse plenty of flavor, and expose the skin so it will crisp up. The latter recipe marinates the chicken in Japanese sake (rice wine) to produce a very fragrant result with minimal seasoning.

After combining the two recipes together with a twist, I managed to:

  • Eliminate the brining and marinating process.
  • Use minimal ingredients.
  • Get super juicy chicken – you can see the juice seeping out when you cut the chicken.
  • Crisp up the skin evenly without turning on the broiler.
  • Perfect skin that is even crispier than fried bacon.
  • Minimal prep, no chopping.
  • Shorten the baking time to barely 30 minutes.

5-Ingredient Baked Chicken Thigh - Perfect for a weekday dinner. All you need is: five minutes active cooking time, five ingredients, and 30 minutes baking time to get the juiciest texture with crispy skin. No brining or broiling required.

Even better, there are many choices when it comes to serving. You can

Ready to cook some chicken?

5-Ingredient Baked Chicken Thigh - Perfect for a weekday dinner. All you need is: five minutes active cooking time, five ingredients, and 30 minutes baking time to get the juiciest texture with crispy skin. No brining or broiling required.

If you give this recipe a try, let us know! Leave a comment, rate it (once you’ve tried it), and take a picture and tag it #omnivorescookbook on Instagram! I’d love to see what you come up with. Cheers, friends!

5.0 from 4 reviews
5-Ingredient Baked Chicken Thigh
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Author:
Recipe type: Main
Cuisine: Chinese Fusion
Serves: 4 to 6
Ingredients
  • 8 pieces skin-on bone-in chicken thigh
  • 1 cup Japanese sake (or rice wine)
  • 2 tablespoons soy sauce (or tamari for gluten-free)
  • Ground sea salt and black pepper
  • 1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper (or paprika powder for less spiciness)
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 220 C (425 F) convection.
  2. Dry chicken thighs thoroughly with paper towel.
  3. Combine Japanese sake and soy sauce in a large baking dish. Stir to mix well. Add chicken thighs, skin side up. Arrange them to expose more skin and avoid overlapping.
    5-Ingredient Baked Chicken Thigh Cooking Process
  4. Generously grind sea salt and black pepper onto the chicken skin. Evenly sprinkle cayenne pepper (or paprika).
    5-Ingredient Baked Chicken Thigh Cooking Process 5-Ingredient Baked Chicken Thigh Cooking Process
  5. Bake until the skin is crispy and a thermometer inserted near the bone reads 165 F, about 30 minutes.
    5-Ingredient Baked Chicken Thigh Cooking Process
  6. Let cool for 5 to 10 minutes. Serve warm as main.
  7. To reheat leftover chicken, bake the chicken with the remaining pan sauce at 180 degrees C (350 F) until warm. The chicken will stay moist.

The nutrition facts are calculated based on 1 of the 6 servings generated by this recipe.

Easy Swiss Chard Stir Fry Nutrition Facts

Disclosure

Omnivore's Cookbook is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com.
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Meet Maggie

Hi I'm Maggie Zhu! Welcome to my site about modern Chinese cooking - including street food, family recipes, and restaurant dishes. I take a less labor-intensive approach while maintaining the taste and look of the dish. I am originally from Beijing, and now cook from my Austin, Texas kitchen.

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13 thoughts on “5-Ingredient Baked Chicken Thigh

  1. Elizabeth @ Bowl of Delicious!

    I will never understand people that don’t like crispy chicken skin. It’s the best part! It’s like saying you don’t like bacon… I DON’T BELIEVE IT! 🙂 This looks super delicious, really simple, and the photos are gorgeous!

    Reply
  2. Kathleen | Hapa Nom Nom

    Crispy chicken skin is the BEST! If I could just buy that, I would! This looks so incredible, Maggie – and I love that I can have my crispy skin and not all the added fat that frying gets you. Delicious!

    Reply
  3. Pingback: 5-Ingredient Baked Chicken Thigh | Omnivore’s Cookbook – Foodie Fine Foods

  4. Julie Young

    I tried this last night and it was absolutely delicious! I used Hungarian hot paprika instead of the cayenne pepper just to tame it down a little and they turned out spicy, juicy and flavorful. I will definitely be making this again. So easy, and so delicious!

    So far, every recipe of yours I’ve tried as been amazing… the sichuan chicken, hot and sour soup, cantonese broccoli with oyster sauce, and now this! Thank-you!

    Reply
    1. Maggie Post author

      Hi Julie, thanks so much for sharing your cooking experience! Hungarian hot paprika sounds delicious! Sometimes I use Spanish smoked paprika, and the dish turned out great too.
      I’m so glad to hear you tried out many of my dishes! You just made my day 🙂

      Reply
  5. helen @ Scrummy Lane

    I love this sort of simple chicken recipe, Maggie. And we always buy skin-on thighs. I pick the skin off and leave it (!!) but the husband not only eats his own, but mine too! I think if I got the thin-skinned chicken that you’re describing, though, I might try eating the skin – that’s where a lot of the flavour is, after all!

    Reply
  6. Mickey Berman

    Dear Maggie,
    I enjoy your blog with your recipes very much. Thank you.
    I wonder if I can ask a question which has nothing to do with today’s recipe?
    I often visit China town in London’s Soho, and frequently eat at the Golden Dragon restaurant. They do a wonderful Cantonese roast duck, and serve a fantastic sauce to go with it. The sauce is similar to Hoi-Sin sauce, but is a bit sweeter and a tiny bit more piquant. I tried using Hoi sin at home when I make Cantonese roast duck, but the duck is no where near as tasty with it as with the restaurant sauce. Could you help me with a recipe? I would also appreciate a good authentic recipe for the Cantonese roast duck itself. Thanking you in advance, I will wait for your next recipes.

    Reply
    1. Maggie Post author

      Hi Mickey, I believe you’re talking about plum sauce. I’m trying to develop a nice plum sauce. I’ve tried store bought ones and they’re not nearly as good.
      I do agree with you about Cantonese roast duck. They are SO GOOD! It’s one of my favorite Cantonese dishes. I’d be more than happy to develop a recipe for it. The cooking process includes air dry the duck and roast. Quite straight forward but a bit time consuming. I have a Cantonese roast chicken recipe (http://omnivorescookbook.com/cantonese-roast-chicken) if you want to try out. And I also have a very nice duck recipe: http://omnivorescookbook.com/slow-roast-duck OK now I sounds like self-promo. But believe me, it’s one of the best homemade duck recipe I’ve ever tried.
      I’m so happy to hear you care about duck too Mickey! I’ve been wanting to share more duck recipes, but unfortunately it’s not a big thing here. Can you get fresh duck in London? Is it expensive there too?
      Please bear me if I need to take some time to test recipes. But I promise I’ll do a post about Cantonese duck some day. Too delicious not to share 🙂

      Reply